MENU

Zerodouble Emollient Gel for elderly pruritus, ichtyosis, dermatitis, eczema, & psoriasis - 475g, 100g


  • This product has ingredient evidence. Read more in the Research & Evidence section below
  • Powerful emollient and humectant
  • Double moisturising action for dry skin
  • Suitable for all ages
£7.49
In stock ()
+
-
Currently sold out
  • Free shipping in all of UK
  • Next day delivery option
  • 30-day return policy

Description

Zerodouble Gel is another of the moisturising products in the Zeroderma range made by Thornton & Ross in the U.K. This range aims to provide products that are similar to other well-known brand names on the market, but at a lower price.

Zerodouble is often compared to Doublebase Gel and contains similar ingredients (see below).

The gel is an intense moisturiser that is formulated to alleviate the dry skin associated with eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, ichthyosis, elderly pruritus, and other conditions.

It has an opaque appearance and a formula that is less greasy than an ointment.

The emollients contained in the gel leave a fine layer of oil on the skin’s surface to reduce evaporation, moisturise the skin, and leave it feeling smoother and more flexible. The humectants help to draw moisture to the surface from the deeper skin layers.

When used as directed, it is safe for both children and adults of all ages, and can generally be used in conjunction with other treatments for dry skin conditions.

It contains no colours or fragrances and is SLS-free.

Ingredients

The ingredients in Zerodouble Gel are:

  • Isopropyl Myristate
  • Liquid Paraffin
  • Glycerol
  • Acrylate C10-C30 Alkyl Acrylate Cross Polymer
  • Sorbitan Laurate
  • Triethanolamine
  • Phenoxyethanol
  • Purified Water 

Directions

Apply the gel with clean hands to the affected areas of skin as often as required, smoothing it into the skin in the same direction as hair growth.

If using as part of your daily bathing routine, apply a thin layer of the gel before bathing or showering, to prevent further drying of the skin.

Precautions

Keep Zerodouble Gel away from small children. Use only externally and avoid contact with the eyes.

Do not use the gel if you have a known allergy to any of the ingredients. Allergic reactions are possible on extremely sensitive skin. If this happens, stop using the gel and consult with your doctor or pharmacist.

Also check with your doctor before using on cracked, broken, or infected skin.

The gel is considered safe to use while pregnant or breastfeeding, but check with your doctor if you are unsure.

Side Effects

In rare cases, Zerodouble Gel can cause a mild skin reaction, such as a rash. Be careful when using on extremely sensitive skin and cease use if there is a reaction.

No interactions with any other medicines have been reported.

Research & Evidence

For people with Psoriasis

HelloSkin’s expert were unable to find clinical data on the use of Zerodouble Emollient Gel in psoriasis. However, the product contains liquid paraffin and glycerol, which are known to help prevent water evaporating from the skin surface. Furthermore, glycerin which is found naturally in the skin helps attract and retain water from the deeper skin layers, thereby helping hydrating and moisturising the skin (1). In dry skin conditions, including also psoriasis, water loss from the upper skin layer is linked to a reduced skin barrier function, which can aggravate disease symptoms (2).

For people with Eczema

HelloSkin’s experts were unable to find any scientific data on the use of Zerodouble Emollient Gel in people with atopic eczema. However, the product contains liquid paraffin and glycerol, which are known to help prevent water evaporating from the skin surface. Furthermore, glycerin which is found naturally in the skin helps attract and retain water from the deeper skin layers, thereby helping hydrating and moisturising the skin (1). In dry skin conditions, including also atopic eczema, water loss from the upper skin layer is linked to a reduced skin barrier function, which can aggravate disease symptoms (2).


References

  1. Dermatol Ther. 2004;17 Suppl 1:49-56
  2. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2003;4(11):771-88
- was added to your cart.